Caring for Your Pet’s During the Holiday Season

With the end of the year fast approaching, people are getting ready for the holiday season. It is important to properly plan for the welfare of your animal whether you are staying at home, travelling or spending time away from your pet. We’ve put together some helpful tips to ensure your pet remains happy and healthy during the festive season.

The holiday season brings with it a chance to unwind after a stressful year of work, spend quality time with loved ones and of course eat delicious, and perhaps not-so-healthy foods.

This is a busy time of year so prior planning should be put in place to ensure the wellbeing of your animal, particularly when travelling.

Festive Season Dangers

There are a few hidden dangers lurking within this special time of year. Foods, decorations and other environmental factors can harm your pet’s physical and emotional health without warning.

  1. Foods: Chocolates, sugar-free Xylitol treats (read more here), grapes and onions all feature prominently on lazy summer holiday menus. These foods are dangerous and even deadly if consumed by your dog. Make sure food is packed away properly and your dog cannot access scraps or even cupboards. Make sure your guests also understand not to feed your dog human food or leave food lying around (if your favourite four-legged friend is an opportunist).
  2. Christmas Trees and Festive Decorations: Ensure your Christmas tree is secured properly so boisterous pets don’t injure themselves or cause damage when bumping into the tree. Make sure your pets aren’t left alone in rooms with burning candles and potpourri, tinsel and other flammable decorations. If you own an inquisitive cat, consider leaving tinsel off the tree this year to prevent injury and ingestion.
  3. Environment: Create a safe space for your animal during excitable periods like entertaining guests. Depending on the type of pet you own this could be a kennel, perch or even a room. If your pet is left in a quiet room ensure they have food, water and access to fresh air during the hot summer. If your pet is excitable or scared, consider a toy or two and a comfortable bed for reassurance. Visit our webstore to find the perfect toy or bed for your pet!

Travel & Extended Periods Without Your Pet

  1. Place your pet in kennels or a cattery. Whilst these options can be expensive a good kennel or cattery is worth every penny. Knowing your pet is safe and being properly looked after will ensure you can relax and enjoy your holiday too. Always do adequate research, by speaking to your vet or friends, before trusting a kennel with your pet. Not all pets are suitable to be placed in kennels and most good kennels may be booked out early.
  2. Pet Sitters & Dog Walkers

This alternative to kennels is often cheaper than kennels and is also only suitable for certain types of pets. Sitters often travel to your home or pets can be placed in their home. Always check a sitter’s references and use your intuition. If you don’t get a good vibe, listen to your instincts and find an alternative sitter.

Travelling with Your Pet

  1. Air Travel: Guide dogs and service animals are permitted to fly in the cabin on airplanes, provided they meet the requirements of the particular airline or country you are travelling to. They will also require a car safety harness which you can also find in our webstore. Identification and your pet’s documentation with certain vaccination proof may also be required. Remember to pack your leads, harnesses and bedding and a favourite toy or blanket to ease the stress of air travel.
  2. Car Travel: Ensure your pet is secured in the rear of the vehicle and cannot enter the driver’s area when excited or under heavy braking.  Hammocks are a great way to keep dogs comfortable on the back seat and protect your seats for unwanted hair.

Be aware of heatstroke:

  • Avoid travelling in hot weather
  • Park in shade and do not leave your animal in the car
  • Stop often for fresh air and provide your dog with plenty of fresh water
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